Tag Archives: African American

Oldie But Goodie!

24 Aug

 
A friend of mine tried out naptural85’s Summer Fun Curly Fro tutorial and hers turned out so well that I decided to try it too. Of course I had to modify it a bit bc I usually just have a day to do my hair & I can’t get away with a scarf at work in the office too well soooo I had to try & speed up my drying time. Because my hair is so thick, air drying doesn’t always work too well unless I have at least a full day & night to allow it to dry. So, I may use a diffuser or sit under the hooded dryer to speed up the drying time.

My sis-in-law made me some flax seed gel to use & I really liked it! It goes on smoother than the Fantasia IC gel that I usually use. The only challenge is that I didn’t get to use it all before I think it went bad (it smelled funny in the fridge…lol).

So, I used flax seed gel on freshly washed hair, followed the tutorial video below & sat w/it under the hooded dryer for about an hour, and slept in a scarf overnight. In the morning….it was still a little wet so I diffused it some to wear it like this:

P.S. My FAV part of the tutorial was something that I had never even thought of doing before but will do all the time now, she put a scarf around the front of her hair to hold it down while she manipulated the rest of her hair & that worked wonders because the front of my hair doesn’t always do what the rest of my hair does and I end up pinning the front back later, so why not start with it that way?! Genius!

     

I tried it again the next week but did more of a bantu knot than the pin curl & it turned out like this:

I think if I were to let it fully dry & did the pin curls it’d turn out similar to hers but it still will just define whatever your natural curl pattern is.

Check out her tutorial video here:

 

Enjoy!

 

© Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls, 2011. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, documents, and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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Using Samples AGAIN!

26 Apr

I washed my hair on Tuesday morning using the samples from before and I had forgotten that I was amazed at the thickness & consistency of the Design Essentials Sulfate free shampoo.

It’s a light honey color & about the consistency of honey but not sticky. This shampoo I feel did pretty well in my hair, I’d actual buy this (once I run out of what I already have, no PJ over here!).
I used loads of the conditioner this time & a ton of the Cashmere Curls (somebody tell me what is in that stuff anyway…?!)

For ALL CURLY HAIR TYPES – creates shiny, soft curls

Every curly dreams of healthy, defined, soft, manageable curls…Cashmere Curls is your dream come true! Formulated with pure Cashmere Extract, Certified Organic Aloe Leaf and Coconut Milk, Cashmere Curls softens, strengthens, repairs, defines, and moisturizes damaged tresses leaving them bouncy, shiny and silky smooth. By bonding to the hair shaft, Cashmere Curls strengthens 3 layers of the hair thus enhancing the curl pattern.

How To Use:

  • Use alone as a curl defining, sheen enhancing, softening, and strengthening styler (fine-medium textured curls).
  • Use under your favorite CURLS styler to soften, hydrate, enhance curl definition (thick, kinky textured curls).
  • Mixed with your favorite CURLS conditioner to deep treat your tresses.
Ingredients:
Botanically Infused H2o, Glycerin, Hydrolyzed Keratin – Cashmere Extract, Certified Organic Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Certified Organic Anthemis Nobilis (Flower) Extract, Certified Organic Coconut Extract, Bean Tree, Lactamide MEA, Acetamide MEA, Polyquaternium-7, Polysorbate 80,Hydrolyzed Corn Starch, Lactic Acid, Diisopropyl Adipate, Polyquaternium-10, Phenoxyethanol, Natural Fragrance.

(to the point where my hair was white) just to get a better idea of the type of hold/defined curls I could get with these and I was pleasantly surprised. I used my diffuser because I didn’t have time to air dry but these are my mid day results (I should have taken some pics right after use but I will next time).

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© Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls, 2011. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, documents, and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Natural Hair Barbie Dolls!

23 Nov

They look like real people...

Take a look at these natural hair dolls on BGLH!
And you can make your own…what?!?! How cute is that? 🙂

Natural Hair Barbie Divas here (from Care4Curls FB page):

Where were these when I was a kid (even though I didn’t do the whole Barbie thing, maybe I would have if I had these!) ?!?! 

© Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls, 2011. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, documents, and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Lazy Hair Days…

10 Nov

Hola friends!

You ever have a lazy hair day…or a lazy hair week….couple of weeks?!  I’ve really been wearing this “retro braid variation” all week and I LOVE it because I just moisturize (probably twice this week), throw some oil on my scalp & satin scarf it up at night then take the scarf off in the morning and GO!  It’s easy, cute, sophisticated & lots of people like it. However, I need some inspiration for a new style…

A friend of mine did this…however, she’s in Cali now…I’m on the east coast…maybe I can create something from this:

By Asia Alston

Makes me miss my mini twists… 😦

What styles are inspiring you lately?

 

 

 

© Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls, 2011. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, documents, and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

“Excuse Me, But I Can’t See Around Your BIG Hair!”

6 Nov

“Excuse me, but I can’t see around your BIG hair, can you move to the back of the room?!”

BIG hair, don't care!

This statement came about on a couple of Facebook posts from a friend that will remain anonymous.  Basically, this person was in a classroom every week and it seemed that the girl with the “BIG hair” would always sit in front of her and she couldn’t see anything around her.  So, she began taking pictures of the back of the girl’s head and posting it to her Facebook profile.  People commented on the pictures saying different things:

“LOL!”
“is that a bush?!”
“that’s a nappy headed…..I forget the rest”
“I think that’s where they hid Jimmy Hoffa”
“is that hair? take a razor to that thing!”
“is that real hair or a wig?!”
“you definitely have to tell them to move to the back”

There were many more comments, all from people who do not have big hair.  So, I read through it and wasn’t too offended because nothing too nasty was stated and I understood where my friend was coming from because I do have big hair and I KNOW it’s big and can get in the way. I think about that when I find a seat at church or the movies etc. I’ll even just turn around and ask the person behind me if they can see because I know it can be in the way.

However, clearly this was an African-American woman who probably will never see these pictures of the back of her head and will never hear about these comments about her hair.  She had pretty hair too, it may have been a wig because it looked exactly the same in every pic (I can’t get my hair to do that).  But like I said before, none of the commenter’s were people with big hair so I figured I’d let my friend know my own suggestion/thoughts just based off of what I read and if I was in the “big hair” girl’s shoes.  My response to her:

“I understand what you mean with not being able to see around this big hair but I guess I’m on the opposite end because I have big hair too (that’s just the way it is naturally). I try to take that into consideration when I choose a seat at church or sometimes I’ll just ask the person behind me can they see. This girl has pretty hair by the way, it may be a wig but it’s pretty nonetheless. I’d suggest to avoid any conflict that you just move to the front of the room then you don’t have to worry about the mouthful that you may receive from asking the girl to move to the back of the room because of her hair.  It probably wouldn’t be a good idea to show her that you’ve been taking pictures of her hair each week and posting them on your FB page for all of your friends to see.  You may end up getting a mouthful because we tend to have to deal with this on a regular basis hence the comments on all these pictures.”

I wasn’t trying to be rude and I didn’t want to get into all the implications of the black girl with the big hair having to move to the ‘back’ of the room and everything Jim Crow, civil rights etc that can go along with that…it’s facebook and it’s not that deep (I know the girl from high school and she’s really a nice person & I get it, she just plain couldn’t see).  But I believe I got my point across to her because she immediately apologized to me in a personal message and deleted the comments & pics from her page saying:

“I totally see now that those pictures could be offensive to people. I was not thinking about how it could come off….I am sorry” :(😦

I wasn’t expecting her to delete everything but that was a nice gesture, so maybe I did a good thing to broaden the mindset of 1 more person, even if it was only a little bit.  I try to avoid conflict most times because it’s usually not worth the effort/time but I do speak my mind when I feel it’s necessary or to help someone out, give them a different way of looking at things so this is my message to you:

*In a polite & educated way, speak your mind, get your point across, but 1st examine yourself and try to see things from the other person’s perspective.  If you have BIG hair like me, take other people into consideration and don’t just sit in the front of the room where people can’t see around you, it’s ok to sit to the side sometimes, you know everyone will notice your BEAUTIFUL BIG hair regardless of where you sit. “Big hair don’t care!” (but do care a little bit)  🙂

Was there a time when you felt that you should speak out about something and didn’t? Felt you missed your opportunity and wish you could go back or do you always speak your mind on every issue at hand?

© Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls, 2011. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, documents, and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

“A Life In Hair” article

10 Oct

Take a look at this cool little article from ACBF on a newspaper article from The Philadelphia Inquirer‘s: Mirror Mirror, A Life in Hair.
     Cjwalker For Va Mag
Image
Afro Abe Progression Detail

Take a look at her whole exhibition in Philly: Sonya Clark Solo Exhibition

Quotes:

“My art is not about being defiant…This is an expression of my identity. . . . It’s my story.”
“The relationship between African American women and their hair is complex. At times it’s been hated and feared as well as loved and revered.”
-S. Clark “Mirror, Mirror A Life In Hair” By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
© Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls, 2011. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, documents, and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Being Natural For Real Or For Fake?

29 Sep

I came across this article on Curlynikki.com by Rashea Hamilton, “Obsessed with hair manipulation…am I truly a natural?”.  She talks about how she manipulates her hair doing twist outs, using dyes, manipulating her hair texture constantly and if by doing these things means that she is not really a natural hair girl.  She goes on to tell her hair story through the years and how she went back & forth some with being natural.  Then she poses the question:

“What does it mean to be natural?”

My take on it is this:

When I had relaxed hair (ages 5-23) I didn’t really start doing any different styles with my hair until 10th grade in high school thanks to my own interest in my hair and my friends interest in my hair (I was definitely a huge tom-boy all the years before that thanks to my older brother).  I remember my group of girl friends & I got sent to the Principals office in 8th grade because my friend (CRYSTAL, yes I’m putting you out there for getting me in trouble, lol! Remember that teacher that told on us…we couldn’t stand her!) brought a battery operated curling iron to school and they were curling my hair in the locker room (guess I was the test subject because I had the longest hair at the time).  The Principal acted like she was upset then she was asking all kinds of questions about the curling iron, like she was gonna take ours home for herself!

8th grade Principal confiscated our cordless curling iron...lol

 

I didn’t do much to my hair besides wearing it in a ponytail, half up and the rest down, maybe a side swoop (check my pics…its the same hairstyle every year, earlier years it was that tight bang in the front, then a side bang, then the swoop lol).  But all throughout this time I was still getting relaxers.  I didn’t consider my hair or myself to be natural until I stopped getting relaxers and cut off the remainder of my permed hair.  At that point my hair was back in its natural/the hair I was born with, state.

Now, you could go further on to say that there are different stages of being natural:

1. natural & using hair dye/coloring (still a type/degree of a chemical in most cases)

2. natural & using regular hair products/styling products (products that don’t have all-natural ingredients)

3. natural & using all natural hair products

 

There’s probably many more stages but ultimately, I think as long as you are not chemically changing the texture of your hair then you have natural hair any kind of way that you style it, an afro, bantu-knots, twist outs, braids when that hair gets wet, puffs out or shrinks up…oh yes, it’s natural hair. It’s all up to you, whatever stage of being natural you would like to be (and of course that definitely changes), be that, be natural and love your curls! 🙂

 

So, what DOES it mean to be natural and have natural hair?

© Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls, 2011. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, documents, and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

“…the Politics of Free Hair” Response

19 Sep

So I read this article over the weekend by: Chocolate Hair Vanilla Care: a blog by a Caucasian mom that talks about her natural hair care for her adopted African-American daughter (she’s soooo cute by the way!)  Anyhoo, in her article, “A Vanilla Perspective on the Politics of Free Hair”, she talks about the challenges & comments she  receives when her daughter wears her hair in its “free state” afro, natural, just out.  (She has another post showing how she did her daughter’s hair for “Afro Independence Day” (I never heard of it either…lol) check Boo out )

 After reading the 1st article though I thought it was impressive & very important that this mom is taking the steps to make sure her daughter embraces her hair in any/every style she wears it.  What is really great is that she’s starting this with her at such a young age.  It’s hard being a kid as it is, then add-on being African-American, wearing natural hair, being adopted…most kids just want to play & have fun with their friends, they’re not thinking about all of this other mess but can still be hurt by the nasty words of so-called friends.

From my own experience I’ve heard all kind of negative names about my hair from when I was a child “horse hair, coffee beans, cotton, sponge, blacky-locks, mop…” the list goes on, but as a kid I don’t think I realized the lingering effects this had on me & my thoughts about my own hair.  Even now, I usually don’t wear my hair “out, in an afro/its natural state” I’m still, even at age 27, not used to wearing it that way because it’s so big, different and people aren’t used to it looking that way.  I really don’t want to deal with anyone’s comments, crazy looks or any nonsense because my response may not be so nice.  So, here’s my pledge: I will love my natural hair through the good & bad days, nice or not-so-nice comments and will continue to rock it day in & day out!

I believe this is an important and very ‘real’ topic amongst African-American women and it probably has deeper roots than just the surface that I have touched here. So share your thoughts or comments too, I have so much more to say about this but it will have to be said over many posts…

(I hate & love this video at the same time…lol. I get what they’re trying to do but….idk, smh.)

Happy Monday! 

© Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls, 2011. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, documents, and images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Ashley Brown and 24sevencurls with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.